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 Language and Experience

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Admin
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PostSubject: Language and Experience   Sat Oct 11, 2008 2:38 pm

Here Halliday insists on the question of planning and selection of language options stating that we "use language to represent our experience of the processes, persons, objects, abstractions, qualities, states and relations of the world around us and inside us". At this point, it'd be interesting if we came up with statements that may illustrate this notion, as follows:


PROCESSES (Javier and Vanesa) - Good
PERSONS (Camila and Ariana)
OBJECTS (Marina and Gisela)
ABSTRACTIONS (Florencia and Gustavo) - Good
QUALITIES (Virginia and Agustina)
STATES (Micaela and Belén)
RELATIONS (Valeria and Julieta G.)
OUTER WORLD (Cintia and Julieta F.)
INNER WORLD (Eliana, Adriana and Marianela)

Do not make them up, rather look for actual utterances in which these notions reflect. Also cite the source.

Example:

Many people assume they aren't rich because they don't earn enough money.
(Yahoo! Finance, October Sat. 11, 2008).
http://finance.yahoo.com/banking-budgeting/article/105934/10-Reasons-You%27re-Not-Rich

The speaker has selected here a statement that represents persons in general and their state (not being rich) in connection to money (the object).


As you must notice here, it's quite likely that the segment you select includes representations of various elements at the same time, but try to find examples where the one I assigned you prevails.


Let's see what you can do! Laughing


Last edited by Admin on Wed Oct 22, 2008 2:38 pm; edited 1 time in total
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florenciaonti



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PostSubject: Re: Language and Experience   Mon Oct 20, 2008 11:26 am

"Life Is like a Box of Chocolates... You Never Know What You're Gonna Get!" (Forrest Gump)

http://bestuff.com/stuff/life-is-like-a-box-of-chocolates-you-never-know-what-youre-gonna-get

The speaker has selected here a statement that represents an abstraction (what is life like). He's comparing life with a box of chocolate, something concrete.(metaphore confused)

We never miss the water till the well runs dry Means that you only realize the importance of something when it is gone.

http://www.englishdaily626.com/proverbs.php?003

The speaker has selected here a statement that represents an abstraction. Uttering this, the addresser doesn’t want to express the literal meaning of words, so the real meaning (proverb) has to be inferred by the addressee.

scratch
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PostSubject: Re: Language and Experience   Tue Oct 21, 2008 8:24 pm

florenciaonti wrote:
"Life Is like a Box of Chocolates... You Never Know What You're Gonna Get!" (Forrest Gump)

http://bestuff.com/stuff/life-is-like-a-box-of-chocolates-you-never-know-what-youre-gonna-get

The speaker has selected here a statement that represents an abstraction (what is life like). He's comparing life with a box of chocolate, something concrete.(metaphore confused)

We never miss the water till the well runs dry Means that you only realize the importance of something when it is gone.

http://www.englishdaily626.com/proverbs.php?003

The speaker has selected here a statement that represents an abstraction. Uttering this, the addresser doesn’t want to express the literal meaning of words, so the real meaning (proverb) has to be inferred by the addressee.

scratch

As to the first example, I don't agree with your calling it a metaphor. Using the preposition "like" makes it a simile. All the same, the construction of the statement belongs in the metaphoric pole of language (Cf metaphor as a figure of speech vs metaphoric pole of language).
The rest is just fine!
For those of you who still have to contribute, please note there's no need to include more than one example. One well selected statement will do.
sunny
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javiers



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PostSubject: Re: Language and Experience   Tue Oct 21, 2008 10:43 pm

"Nobody ever grew despondent looking for trouble" (Kin, Hubbard)
From: http://quotationsbook.com/quote/39635/

“It takes years to build up trust, and only seconds to destroy it” (Anonymous)
From http://cindylellis.wordpress.com/words-to-live-by/lessons-life-has-taught-me/

It seems to us that both sentences represent processes. The two of them contain verbs that suggest actions with relative duration (grow - build - destroy). In the first sentence the copular verb "grow" implies a change undergone by the subject. In general, this verb refers to slow and gradual processes of change. It is more formal than "get" or "go" and a little literary. In the second example, the monotransitive verbs "build" and "destroy" semantically connote processes with stages to be accomplished and the finite verb "take" emphasizes duration. Regardless of time, "build" and "destroy" depict a starting point and a finishing point within the scope of lexical aspect.

Good points!
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agustinam



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PostSubject: LANGUAGE AND EXPERIENCE   Wed Oct 22, 2008 10:52 pm

(...)

"Pride," observed Mary, piqued herself upon the solidity of her reflections, "is a very common failing, I believe. By all that I have ever read, I am convinced that it is very common indeed; that human nature is particularly prone to it, and that there are very few of us who do not cherish a feeling of self-complacency on the score of some quality or other, real or imaginary. Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonimously. A person my be proud without being vain. Preide relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us."

(...)

From Pride and Prejudice - Chapter 5

The speaker has selected a segment that represents and describes two qualities of "human nature": pride and vanity. She also compares and contrasts these two feelings.
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julietaf



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PostSubject: Re: Language and Experience   Thu Oct 23, 2008 10:47 pm

"Stock markets soared yesterday after governments committed trillions of dollars in an unprecedented attempt to prevent the collapse of the international financial system."

(From The Times Online - October 14, 2008)
http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/business/industry_sectors/banking_and_finance/article4938229.ece?&EMC-Bltn=OOYFO9


The speaker has selected here a statement that represents an experience of the outer world. As a journalist, the writer's job is to inform readers about current issues around the world.
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MarinaP



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PostSubject: Re: Language and experience   Thu Oct 23, 2008 11:00 pm

Utterance:

"Diamonds are a girl's best friend" Idea

http://www.reelclassics.com/Actresses/Marilyn/diamonds-lyrics.htm

The speaker has selected here a statement that represents a particular object (diamonds) that is coveted by girls (persons in general) and establishes a relation between them (friendship).

........................................................................................................................................
Utterance:

"It´s the public that feeds the Wall Street beast. In fact, now is the time to end this cyclical con game." Idea

The writer has chosen the word "beast" (= object) to represent the "brokers" from the Stock Exchange. These 2 sentences appear below an amazing paratext, which depicts a bull (Wall Street Beast) defeated. This portrays America´s current situation ofter the bailout.
The "public" (= persons) stands for the executive stakeholders and shareholders that together lead to an "upmarket."
These highly ironic metaphoric sentences mock at the corruptive relationship between the 2 parties. This is emphasised by the noun phrase "con game."

www.usatoday.com
(Wednesday, September 24th, 2008)
Name of the newspaper article; Main Street´s Blind Faith (Related to the bailout)

Gisela and Marina
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MarianelaB



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PostSubject: Re: Language and Experience   Fri Oct 24, 2008 9:19 am

1. The best examples of inner world can be taken from instances of the widely known stream of consciousness technique or inner monologue. We have found this example interesting and highly representative: “The hour is striking, six, the hour I waited for. […] Anyway, he can’t make fun of me after this. I’m going to have a splendid time. Now, why is the stair carpet turned up at the corner here?”
Source: We'll to the Woods No More (New Directions Paperbook) by E Dujardin.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/reader/B0006D7WVQ/ref=sib_fs_top/276-1216693-0528165?ie=UTF8&p=S00X&checkSum=WB%2BSMKLbPrYS4am0rRdozh%2FgOvU3njnxjS%2F%2F1S8JC7o%3D#reader-page
Like a Star @ heaven Analysis: These few sentences illustrate what was going on in the focalizer’s/ narrator’s mind. As it is characteristic of this technique, punctuation is not important as long as the feelings and thoughts are faithfully expressed.
2. Reading an article, we bumped into this paragraph whose first quotation – we think – exemplifes what was going on in the killer’s inner world: “The letter to police voiced two options: taking his own life, or killing himself and his entire family. "He talked himself into the second strategy," Moore said. "That that would be the honorable thing to do."”
Source: Father kills family and himself, despondent over financial losses. http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-porterranch7-2008oct07,0,7425239.story
Like a Star @ heaven Analysis: The fact that the killer “talked himself into” means that he persuaded himself, he was thinking about it on his own and not, e.g., asking for advice from other people.
3. In this example, taken from “Mirror Image by Michelle Bernier” - http://www.rollins.edu/winterwiththewriters/pdf/Bernier2008.pdf - the verb “to wonder” illustrates that the writer has only talked to herself leaving the matter to her inner world: “She wondered what other people saw when they looked at her.”


By Amigone Eliana,Aquilia Adriana and Botta Marianela
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JulietaGrameg



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PostSubject: Re: Language and Experience   Mon Oct 27, 2008 1:24 pm

Statement: "The new Carnegie Mellon University study suggests that using the Internet can cause isolation, loneliness and depression." (Source: http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,989087,00.html)

The speaker has selected a statement that shows the following relations:

* between people in general and the Internet (person-object)
* between the person and his/her inner world (feeling of depression)
* between a person and the rest of the society/group (state of loneliness, isolation. There is no contact at all)

Funes - Gramegna
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RCamila



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PostSubject: Re: Language and Experience   Mon Oct 27, 2008 11:55 pm

Hispanics could put Obama over the top
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3032553


Top Economist: Americans Should Worry About Bank Deposits if Congress Doesn't Act

http://finance.yahoo.com/tech-ticker/article/56994/Top-Economist-Americans-Should-Worry-About-Bank-Deposits-if-Congress-Doesnt-Act?tickers=LEH,MER,BAC,AIG,WM,%5EDJI,%5EGSPC

In these examples the speaker has selected statements that represent persons, both an ethnic group in USA and Americans in general. In addition, both statements illustrate the outer world in that both segments refer to political and economic current issues.

Ronchini - Román
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